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5 edition of Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations found in the catalog.

Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations

Maria Andersson

Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations

by Maria Andersson

  • 342 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Business Studies, Uppsala University in Uppsala .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Subsidiary corporations,
  • International business enterprises -- Management,
  • Knowledge management

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMaria Andersson.
    SeriesDoctoral thesis,, no. 97
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD62.3 .A53 2003
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3771148M
    LC Control Number2003504668
    OCLC/WorldCa52074319

    Management development is seen as a tool to help the firm achieve its strategic goals, not only by giving managers the required skill set, but also by helping to reinforce the desired culture of the firm and by facilitating the creation of an informal network for sharing knowledge within the multinational . Subscribe Buy Share. Twitter Facebook Linkedin Email. What to Read Next. (Details of the study are contained in their article Knowledge Flows Within Multinational Corporations: Explaining Subsidiary Isolation and Its Performance Implications, in press at Organization Science.) Managers at the subsidiaries answered a questionnaire that.

    Hypotheses concerning the relationships between a subsidiary's external technical embeddedness, market performance and the subsidiary's importance for competence development at the level of the MNC are formulated and tested in a LISREL model. Data is used from 97 subsidiaries belonging to 20 global divisions of 13 Swedish multinational. Most studies of subsidiary knowledge flows involve technological knowledge seeking, and exclude currently less important subsidiaries in the multinational corporation (MNC). Yet those subsidiaries are often located in developing markets with high economic growth and expansion opportunities for MNCs. Less is known about knowledge flows between less important subsidiaries, or about operational.

      Applying a new theoretical and empirical approach to intrafirm knowledge transfers, this paper provides some initial insight to the little-researched phenomenon of why some subsidiaries are isolated from knowledge-transfer activities within the multinational corporation (MNC). Knowledge transfer is framed as a problemistic search process. Subsidiary absorptive capacity and knowledge transfer within multinational corporations 10 January | Journal of International Business Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1 Transfer of knowledge in Multinational Corporations (MNC’s) on International Projects.


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Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations by Maria Andersson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The five papers included discuss creation and sharing of subsidiary knowledge. It was confirmed that subsidiaries create knowledge of significance for other units within the multinational corporation. The results show that that one of the main drivers for the creation of knowledge is.

Download Citation | Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations / | A duplicate abstract in 1 leaf inserted. Thesis (doctoral)--Uppsala universitet, Includes. Creating and sharing subsidiary knowledge within multinational corporations.

Another issue is to investigate the role of headquarters’ recognition and of corporate relationships in sharing of subsidiary knowledge. A third issue explored is the use of Centres of Excellence and transnational teams as two organizational forms for knowledge Cited by: KNOWLEDGE SHARING AND SUBSIDIARY R&D Abstract Sharing knowledge across borders has proven to be especially relevant to multinational corporations (MNCs).

Foreign subsidiaries have become active players in these knowledge flows. However, the when subsidiaries have ‘competence-creating scope’ within the corporate organizational by: Corporate sharing of subsidiary knowledge is brought about by headquarters recognition of these units’ knowledge.

This is facilitated if other corporate units have been involved in the creation of that knowledge. Another finding in the study is the use of Centres of Excellence and transnational teams for knowledge creation and : Maria Andersson.

Knowledge Flows Within Multinational Corporations: Explaining Subsidiary Isolation and Its Performance Implications Abstract Applying a new theoretical and empirical approach to intrafirm knowledge transfers, this paper provides some initial insight to the little-researched phenomenon of why some subsidiaries are isolated from knowledge-transfer activities within the multinational corporation (MNC).

1. Introduction. This paper explores overlapping competence-creating activities within the boundaries of the multinational corporation (MNC). Suppose that the MNC acquires a competence-creating subsidiary in any given foreign location that already hosts a competence-creating greenfield subsidiary.

Knowledge sharing is a systematic process for creating, acquiring, synthesizing, learning, sharing and using knowledge to achieve organizational goals.

It is also a source of competitive advantage. Inward flows, or inflows, refer to knowledge acquired by a focal unit from peer units within the same corporation, and outward flows, or outflows, refer to the knowledge disseminated to peer units.

The individual business units of sprawling multinational corporations (MNCs) typically struggle to attain real power in corporate decision making. Subsidiaries, among other things, help large firms exploit distant markets through their regional expertise, and can help allay local residents’ concerns about foreign ownership.

The process by which multinational corporations (MNCs) create value from knowledge was initially conceptualized as a linear sequence: knowledge was created in the firm’s home base and then diffused worldwide in the form of new products and processes (Almeida, Song, & Grant, ). In this view of the process, knowledge transfer tended to be internalized within the MNC in order to.

Books 13 Articles in journals 13 Contributions of the students 14 Optimal knowledge sharing in multinational corporations and their subsidiaries Abstract In this scientific paper we present five theoretical perspectives that each contribute to the theory of optimal knowledge sharing between multinationals and their subsidiaries.

Results obtained highlight that knowledge transfer tools—and particularly technology-based coordination mechanisms—play a crucial role in creating the best environment to share knowledge within multinational corporations.

develop and retain knowledge within each subsidiary When multinational enterprises adopt a strategy, knowledge is developed and retained within each subsidiary. The focus is on sensing and exploiting local opportunities.

See Worldwide learning, innovation, and knowledge management. Sharing knowledge across borders has proven to be especially relevant to multinational corporations (MNCs).

Foreign subsidiaries have become active players in these knowledge flows. However, the network effects of interacting with multiple agents on the evolution of the R&D role played by subsidiaries are still undeveloped.

Knowledge sharing has attracted considerable interest in the context of the multinational corporation. However, although there is evidence to support the view that effective knowledge sharing is. While a large body of research in the context of multinational corporations (MNCs) indicates that increases in knowledge transfer lead to better subsidiary performance, some.

Purpose – This paper aims to look at the issue of culture's role in knowledge transfer within multinational corporations (MNCs). Studies of MNCs have hinted at the importance of culture to the performance of subsidiaries.

In this paper, we explore under which conditions subsidiaries of multinational corporations can benefit from the external networks of sister subsidiaries in terms of new knowledge generation.

We focus on the phenomenon of unconnected sister alliances—that is, alliances of sister subsidiaries with whom the focal subsidiary lacks a recent. Abstract and Key Results This paper develops a conceptual framework addressing the development and sharing of knowledge by Centres of Excellence and transnational teams, which are important organisational mechanisms used by headquarters to manage knowledge processes within multinational corporations.

The inherent differences of Centres of Excellence and transnational. Pursuing a nodal (i.e., subsidiary) level of analysis, this paper advances and tests an overarching theoretical framework pertaining to intracorporate knowledge transfers within multinational corporations (MNCs).To date, much of the research in the knowledge management area has focused on inter-organizational transfer ofknowledge either within a country or across boundaries (Bjorkman, Bamer-Rasmussen «fe Li, ).

Presumably, intra-organization knowledge transfer is easier than inter-organizational knowledge transfer (e.g., Kogut «fe Zander, ).The _____ is an organized collection of people, procedures, software, databases, and devices to create, store, share, and use the organization's knowledge and experience.

knowledge management system _____ is a branch of artificial intelligence that allows computers to recognize and .